This review will be in a detail bullet point.

Prologue:

  • The film is based on the non-fictional novel of the same name. Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief  written by Lawrence Wright.
  • Lawrence does star in the film and he gives a clear break of Scientology from third person view.
  • People of Scientology tried to stop the film showing on HBO. Luckily for us, HBO didn’t back off, nor the creator of the film Alex Gibney.
  • Alex Gibney is a well-known director of documentary films like  We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks, Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God (the winner of three prime time Emmy awards), and Taxi to the Dark Side (winner of the 2007 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature), focusing on an innocent taxi driver in Afghanistan who was tortured and killed at Bagram Air Force Base in 2002.
  • Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief is a film that’s really hard to watch, but at the same time you have to watch it. Before, I start this review off. Let’s go back to the root cause of Scientology within the film

ACT 1:

  • We get a good amount of information about the creator of L. Ron Hubbard. This scumbag of the human race life is filled with nothing lies, hurting the ones he loves, and bullying people out of their money. Hubbard was born Lafayette Ronald Hubbard, March 13, 1911.
  • Hubbard started out a Sci-Fi writer and still holds the Guinness World Record for the most audio books published by one author. For the most part the film points out that basics of mythos behind Scientology that came from Hubbard sci-fi books that he published.
  • Hubbard left the Navy because, according to the Church of Scientology: “The U.S. Navy attempted to monopolize all his research and force him to work on a project ‘to make man more suggestible’. When he was unwilling, he says they tried to blackmail him by ordering him back to active duty to perform this function. Having many friends he was able to instantly resign from the Navy and escape this trap.”
  • As you already know this was a lie. Hubbard spent the last months of his service in a hospital, being treated for a duodenal ulcer. . He was removed both times  from the USS YP-422 and USS PC-815 when his superiors found him incapable of command.
  • Also, the film also made shocking acclaim that Hubbard kidnapped his own children. Kidnapped, mind you, from his ex-wife. Hubbard went with the child to Cuba.
  • Hubbard was a real time moocher. One of the main reasons why Hubbard created Scientology, so he didn’t have to pay taxes
  • Hubbard is pretty much Jim Jones, because Hubbard ideas, just like Jones,  destroyed a lot of lives.
  • Hubbard spent most of his life remaining for  on a ranch near Creston, California, where he died in 1986.

 

ACT 2

  • At this point in the film talks about how Scientology was grown in followers and power within American in the early 80’s all the way to mid 2000’s. This is where things get more shocking and hard to believe.
  • Scientology launched Operation called Snow White. A covert operation aimed at infiltrating governments. Yes, this plan was very ballsy and sadly had clever ideas.
  • Scientology agents broke into IRS headquarters, bugged its offices, and dispatched private investigators to spy on individual agents—all in hopes of blackmailing officials.
  • The new leader of the so-called religion is David Miscavige. This scumbag was groomed by Hubbard himself. Miscavige is 100% paranoid about the people in his church, government and pretty much anybody who he thinks is looking at him funny. David Miscavige was born on April 30, 1960  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Miscavige has ruled the church with an iron fist.
  • Ex-members, enforcers, PR, and personal blackmail groups research and keep church and church member secrets safe. They would keep this info as leverage if needed at a later time. This would include on the infamous building called The Hole. I’ll explain more in the next Act. However,  the actress Nicole Kidman was a victim of wiretapping by Scientology to deliberately  break up her marriage with Tom Cruise.
  •  She was labeled a “potential trouble source” by the organization, aka David Miscage. The film made shocking remarks that John Travolta has been forced to stay with Scientology out of fear that his homosexual lifestyle will be exposed.
  • Ex-members recall moments where they give low-level actors big roles of the center. For example, big names like John Travolta and Tom Cruise. An ex-Enforce who did blackmailing did indeed own up to his crimes. He gives us full detail on how they do, which is randomized AUDITING. It’s a shrink meeting you every day in a random fashion, none of  the auditors are licensed in psychology. They have since banned that type of practice in their teachings.
  •  Ex-Members say they used E-Meter which is for a shortened term for electro psycho-meter. They this tool to steal information inside a celebrity mind and get them to tell them all their dark secrets that the public shouldn’t know about. And, yes the E-Meter is a small Lie-Detector. Tom Cruise was a true believer in this madness.
  • This explains how Tom Cruise fame made the church even bigger to get more celebrities of Hollywood. The film did show that infamous interview of Tom Cruise talking like a madman about Scientology. The movie acknowledged that it was bat-shit crazy.

 

ACT 3

  • Then the films go into the darker side of Scientology.
  • David Miscavige built The Hole at Gold Base (also known as Int Base) at Gilman Hot Springs, California. Miscavige sent dozens of senior Scientology executives to the Hole.
  • The Hole was indeed placed in Gold, Base (also variously known as Gold, Int Base, or Int) is the international headquarters of the Church of Scientology.
  • The Hole broke a lot of wills and minds of the members of Scientology. It was man-made Hell on Earth.
  • This is where… The film itself broke my heart on some many levels.

According to author Janet Reitman, Miscavige reintroduced it in the 2000s and ordered dozens of senior executives to go outdoors in the middle of the night and assemble at the base’s swimming pool or its muddy lake. They would then jump or be pushed into the water, often in freezing conditions, while fully clothed and with Miscavige watching.

The Church acknowledges that overboardings took place, but characterizes it as part of its “ecclesiastical justice” system for dealing with poor performance.

One member was said to have been forced to clean a bathroom with his tongue

What made things even more sad was at the end of the contest, Miscavige ordered that all the executives were to stay in the conference room and sleep under the tables until further notice. They stayed there for the next few days, with occasional deliveries of food, before being released.

The Church’s then chief spokesman, Tommy Davis, has acknowledged that the “musical chairs” incident occurred and says that it was “intended to demonstrate how disruptive wholesale changes could be to an organization” but dismisses the accounts of threats and violence.

Later in 2004, according to Reitman, a purge was carried out of staff at the base. Hundreds were sent to the RPF while dozens of others were offloaded and expelled from the Sea Org with huge “freeloader bills” presented to them for the Church services they had received over the years. Dozens of senior executives were accused of being “suppressive persons”.

They were said to have been confined in the management team offices and ordered to carry out the “A to E steps”, a set of penances intended to demonstrate that they had repented of their “crimes” and reformed.

In particular, they were to confess and identify which of them were “defying [Miscavige] and sabotaging Scientology with their incompetence”. The management offices, which had formerly been referred to as “the CMO Int trailer”, became known as the “A to E Room,” the “SP Hole,” and ultimately simply “the Hole.

Note: This was pretty much the what the film saying. So, I had to make sure I used a every word the authors and ex-members said. Source; Wiki

ACT 4:

  • Jason Beghe takes over for the rest of the film. Funny to say, Beghe was the first one to start fighting back against Scientology. Beghe posted up a video on YouTube, which oddly disappeared from the website. However, Beghe still pushed hard on taking the control of his life and others who left the church.
  • One by one ex-members explain why they left the church and the reasons aren’t shocking at all. However, the price of leaving the church is high. It involves your family members who are still involved with the church to declare you a Suppressive Person (excommunication).
  • The brainwashing by Scientology was too strong for ex-member’s families and friends to ignore, because the claws of Scientology have been too deep in their minds. As of now, many connections from friends and family member are still unresponsive to the ex-Scientology members.
  • The film end’s with the dates of the members who took part in the documentary that left Scientology.

 

Overall/Score:

Going Clear is a true masterpiece of documentary film. It gave real life counts of the secretive group known as Scientology. History buffs will be hooked into the films, because the film makes you feel bad for the ex-members.  At the same time, understand the root cause of this cult. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief is film is pretty much a MUST WATCH! Going Clear might help some folks breaking free from the cult. That’s pretty much why I love Going Clear. This film was made to warn and or free the people from Scientology.

 

Score: Must Watch

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